Theology Thursday

Theology Thursday

Welcome to Theology Thursday: We present select Bible studies and sermons from Pastor Bob Enyart of Denver Bible Church teaching from Scripture that:
- God is eternally free, inexhaustibly creative, and has existed from everlasting
- His main biblical attributes? He is living, personal, relational, good, and loving
- Proper hermeneutics flow not from Greek and Latin philosophy but from the primary biblical attributes of God
- The Bible explicitly affirms marriage and condemns moral relativism and all immorality including homosexuality
- As God is a person and created us in His likeness He expects us to stand for the personhood of the unborn
- God presents the Gospel of Jesus Christ, based on the death penalty, in Bible's context of criminal justice
- The Bible is not a science text (for they have to be corrected all the time) but instead is scientifically accurate. Enjoy!

ThThurs: Leviticus Pt. 2

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Leviticus: In the book of Leviticus, the law of the priests, God describes the sacrifices He requires of the priests and the Israelites. In this study Bob Enyart looks at the meanings of the burnt offerings and the lamb without spot or blemish. We learn of offerings of birds and of bread, and peace offerings of bull and calf, cow, ox, and goat, and trespass offerings for sin.

God here commands integrity toward our neighbors, diligence in religious service, and the consecration of the Aaron and his sons as priests. Sadly, though they were chosen to be teachers of the people and serve the Lord as priests forever, God kills two of Aaron’s sons, Nadab and Abihu, for their rebellion against Him. God gave to Israel symbolic ordinances both to teach the world eternal truths and to provide a cultural fabric that would bind Israel together keeping them through the millennia as a cohesive ethnic group through whom the Messiah would come and for whom future End Times prophecies will one day be fulfilled.

This 3,500-year-old book presents applications of what, thousands of years later, became modern medical practices. In some contexts an unclean person may have an infectious disease, is diagnosed from bodily discharges, and God instructs isolation, observation, and cleansing, with clothing and personal objects either washed, discarded, or even burned. God even warns that one unclean person or object can make another unclean, revealing all this thousands of years before biblical creationists discovered for the word the germ theory of diseases. God imbues blood with an intensity of symbolic meaning because without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness and because penultimately, Jesus would incense His hearers saying, If you want eternal life, drink My blood. God chose this book also to explicitly condemned all forms of sexual immorality including adultery, incest, and homosexuality. Yet, for those who obey Him, He also filled their lives with the blessings of the annual Feasts of Israel, and the eternal relief symbolized in the very real Sabbatical Years and the once-in-a-life Year of Jubilee! Finally, God’s insistence on treating the poor well was anything but a foundation for a socialist or welfare state. And by the way He created us and the world, with the laws of cause and effect, no man can escape the curses that are all around him, for every act of disobedience, nor can men out give God, with the blessings that He has assured for every act of obedience. For what God expects of men in vows and tithing, He has committed Himself to give infinitely above what we ever could.
Available on Video or Audio.

ThThurs: Leviticus Pt. 1

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Leviticus: In the book of Leviticus, the law of the priests, God describes the sacrifices He requires of the priests and the Israelites. In this study Bob Enyart looks at the meanings of the burnt offerings and the lamb without spot or blemish. We learn of offerings of birds and of bread, and peace offerings of bull and calf, cow, ox, and goat, and trespass offerings for sin.

God here commands integrity toward our neighbors, diligence in religious service, and the consecration of the Aaron and his sons as priests. Sadly, though they were chosen to be teachers of the people and serve the Lord as priests forever, God kills two of Aaron’s sons, Nadab and Abihu, for their rebellion against Him. God gave to Israel symbolic ordinances both to teach the world eternal truths and to provide a cultural fabric that would bind Israel together keeping them through the millennia as a cohesive ethnic group through whom the Messiah would come and for whom future End Times prophecies will one day be fulfilled.

This 3,500-year-old book presents applications of what, thousands of years later, became modern medical practices. In some contexts an unclean person may have an infectious disease, is diagnosed from bodily discharges, and God instructs isolation, observation, and cleansing, with clothing and personal objects either washed, discarded, or even burned. God even warns that one unclean person or object can make another unclean, revealing all this thousands of years before biblical creationists discovered for the word the germ theory of diseases. God imbues blood with an intensity of symbolic meaning because without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness and because penultimately, Jesus would incense His hearers saying, If you want eternal life, drink My blood. God chose this book also to explicitly condemned all forms of sexual immorality including adultery, incest, and homosexuality. Yet, for those who obey Him, He also filled their lives with the blessings of the annual Feasts of Israel, and the eternal relief symbolized in the very real Sabbatical Years and the once-in-a-life Year of Jubilee! Finally, God’s insistence on treating the poor well was anything but a foundation for a socialist or welfare state. And by the way He created us and the world, with the laws of cause and effect, no man can escape the curses that are all around him, for every act of disobedience, nor can men out give God, with the blessings that He has assured for every act of obedience. For what God expects of men in vows and tithing, He has committed Himself to give infinitely above what we ever could.
Available on Video or Audio.

ThThurs: Ecclesiastes Pt. 3

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Ecclesiastes: Without a teacher, men struggle to make sense of backslidden Solomon's book of Ecclesiastes, which says: All is vanity. What is crooked cannot be made straight. Man has no advantage over animals for all go to one place. Nothing is better than that a man should rejoice in his own works. So I praised the dead more than the living. Yet, better than both is he who has never existed. One good man among a thousand I have found, but a woman among all these I have not found. A man has nothing better under the sun than to eat, drink, and be merry. Drink your wine with a merry heart; for God has already accepted your works. 

This study will help you to unravel the Ecclesiastes conundrum and appreciate the compelling love story of the Song of Songs (also called the Song of Solomon). The Shulamite spurns Solomon, despising a place among his harem of wives and concubines, while remaining faithful to her inaccessible true love. This Song illustrates the believer holding fast to his love for God in spite of the lures of the world. 
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: Ecclesiastes Pt. 2

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Ecclesiastes: Without a teacher, men struggle to make sense of backslidden Solomon's book of Ecclesiastes, which says: All is vanity. What is crooked cannot be made straight. Man has no advantage over animals for all go to one place. Nothing is better than that a man should rejoice in his own works. So I praised the dead more than the living. Yet, better than both is he who has never existed. One good man among a thousand I have found, but a woman among all these I have not found. A man has nothing better under the sun than to eat, drink, and be merry. Drink your wine with a merry heart; for God has already accepted your works. 

This study will help you to unravel the Ecclesiastes conundrum and appreciate the compelling love story of the Song of Songs (also called the Song of Solomon). The Shulamite spurns Solomon, despising a place among his harem of wives and concubines, while remaining faithful to her inaccessible true love. This Song illustrates the believer holding fast to his love for God in spite of the lures of the world. 
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: Ecclesiastes Pt.1

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Ecclesiastes: Without a teacher, men struggle to make sense of backslidden Solomon's book of Ecclesiastes, which says: All is vanity. What is crooked cannot be made straight. Man has no advantage over animals for all go to one place. Nothing is better than that a man should rejoice in his own works. So I praised the dead more than the living. Yet, better than both is he who has never existed. One good man among a thousand I have found, but a woman among all these I have not found. A man has nothing better under the sun than to eat, drink, and be merry. Drink your wine with a merry heart; for God has already accepted your works. 

This study will help you to unravel the Ecclesiastes conundrum and appreciate the compelling love story of the Song of Songs (also called the Song of Solomon). The Shulamite spurns Solomon, despising a place among his harem of wives and concubines, while remaining faithful to her inaccessible true love. This Song illustrates the believer holding fast to his love for God in spite of the lures of the world. 
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: 2 Kings Pt. 1

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* 2 Kings: The divided kingdom is symptomatic of Israel's separation from God. In the northern kingdom, the prophet Elijah passing on the mantle of his ministry, along with a double blessing from God, to Elisha. With the defeat of Moab, and the mocking of Syria's blinded army, God's covenant people had opportunity after opportunity to thrive. Instead, their sin brought judgment. Ahab's sons were killed after his wicked widow Jezebel was thrown out of a window to her death. In the southern kingdom of Judah, the sole surviving son of the royal family became king, but eventually Joash too was murdered. After Elisha died, Israel and Judah fought, with rampant paganism in the north so weakening the ten tribes that they were carried carried away captive by the Assyrians. Meanwhile down south, the more benevolent reigns of kings like Azariah, Jotham, Hezekiah, and Josiah only postponed God's judgment until Nebuchadnezzar carried away Judah in the Babylonian captivity. Lessons abound in Second Kings.
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: 1 Kings Pt. 2

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* 1 Kings: As David's life is draining from him, the nation of Israel is set to enter its most terribly trying times. His son Solomon becomes king with a reign so horrific that he fills Judah with altars to pagan gods and his harem of 1,000 women scoffs at God's command that no monarch should multiply wives. Why are the chapters of sacred history filled with such wickedness? Many theologians have claimed that God actually decreed that His own servants would violate His own commands. This Bible study of First Kings, however, allows the Scriptures themselves to expound on the reason for their disobedience. Lessons for the Christian fill this book, from how to gain wisdom, to learning why wisdom alone is insufficient, to the building of the Temple, to the political and moral lessons from Ahab and his wife Jezebel, and ultimately, to the mighty ministry of the Hebrew prophet Elijah, from the fire on Mt. Carmel to hearing the still small voice of the Lord!
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: 1 Kings Pt. 1

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* 1 Kings: As David's life is draining from him, the nation of Israel is set to enter its most terribly trying times. His son Solomon becomes king with a reign so horrific that he fills Judah with altars to pagan gods and his harem of 1,000 women scoffs at God's command that no monarch should multiply wives. Why are the chapters of sacred history filled with such wickedness? Many theologians have claimed that God actually decreed that His own servants would violate His own commands. This Bible study of First Kings, however, allows the Scriptures themselves to expound on the reason for their disobedience. Lessons for the Christian fill this book, from how to gain wisdom, to learning why wisdom alone is insufficient, to the building of the Temple, to the political and moral lessons from Ahab and his wife Jezebel, and ultimately, to the mighty ministry of the Hebrew prophet Elijah, from the fire on Mt. Carmel to hearing the still small voice of the Lord!
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: Book of Ruth Pt. 2

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Ruth: "Now it came to pass, in the days when the judges ruled," that the world gained its oldest book of romance. Ruth's love story tells the world's love story. Ruth became King David's great-grandmother. And since Ruth is not a Jewish woman, but a Moabitess, her inclusion in Christ's genealogy (Mat. 1:5) raises interesting questions. Further, Ruth's mother-in-law, Rahab, had been a Canaanite prostitute. Skeptics dismiss the Bible as exclusionary and unforgiving. But students know the truth. The marriage proposal in this book, from a well-established Jewish man to a widowed Moabite woman, symbolizes God reaching out to fallen man. Boaz, a type of Christ, symbolizes Christ's role as man's redeemer. The Kinsman Redeemer perpetuates the name of the dead, raising up life where there was only death, an inheritance where there was none. 
Available on MP3-CD or download.

ThThurs: Book of Ruth Pt. 1

What We Believe and Why We Believe It* Ruth: "Now it came to pass, in the days when the judges ruled," that the world gained its oldest book of romance. Ruth's love story tells the world's love story. Ruth became King David's great-grandmother. And since Ruth is not a Jewish woman, but a Moabitess, her inclusion in Christ's genealogy (Mat. 1:5) raises interesting questions. Further, Ruth's mother-in-law, Rahab, had been a Canaanite prostitute. Skeptics dismiss the Bible as exclusionary and unforgiving. But students know the truth. The marriage proposal in this book, from a well-established Jewish man to a widowed Moabite woman, symbolizes God reaching out to fallen man. Boaz, a type of Christ, symbolizes Christ's role as man's redeemer. The Kinsman Redeemer perpetuates the name of the dead, raising up life where there was only death, an inheritance where there was none. 
Available on MP3-CD or download.